Presenting on SBG 2019


I have had some incredible opportunities to present on my grading practices journey this summer and wanted to make a post that puts all my resources in one place.

The main presentation I have given this summer is a review of my journey to SBG, the resources I have developed, created, and that others have shared with me, and a little bit of the reading and research I have completed.



From this presentation, I had always felt like it was clear where someone should start on the journey, but I realized after some feedback that the presentation is often overwhelming that what people really needed was one guiding document that reviewed the steps the presentation spells out for you. From that feedback, I created the document below to help you get started on the path to SBG. This isn't something you can do tomorrow in your classroom. It requires careful planning and reflection so don't feel like you have to make this happen for the 2019-2020 school year.



Additionally, I've thought a lot about the question "if you could go back and start over, what would you do differently?"And for me, if I could change my journey to SBG, I would want to do the work with a PLC group. I think this work is best done collectively, I believe we serve our students best when we work together. And with that in mind, I created this guiding document for PLC groups who want to do this work but aren't sure where to start. It works kind of like a hyperdoc and has links to articles, templates, and examples and a place to save your notes each week as your group works through the steps.



I enjoy presenting on making your classroom more standards based because I am consistently asked the hard questions I need to be asked. I love when those I present to raise their concerns and we can talk about them openly. I learn so much from those conversations and am hopeful that I will continue to be able to have them.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Grading Practices Mega Post

Why I Am Leaving Canvas LMS for Google Classroom

Grade Reform: You Can Still Hold Kids Accountable